Friday, June 19, 2015

Starting Giant Commission

About a month back, Glenn Drover, for whom I have painted several 28mm armies, emailed to tell me he was selling off his Napoleonics and switching to 15mm.  Would I be interested in taking on the job?  I agreed, and thus I started a project that will take a year or more: all of the Napoleonic Wars combatants with 15mm AB Miniatures, a total of about 3,000 foot, 1,000 horse, and 100 guns.

I started with the French infantry, since their uniform always seems to take me the longest to paint.  Yesterday I put the finishing touches on my first batch of 144 figures.  These are the fusilier command and elite companies.

Eagle Bearers




Drummers



Officers



Sergeants



Voltiguers and Grenadiers







As always, AB Miniatures are a treat to paint.  No one makes better looking figures in any scale.  The flags are from GMB.  I cut away the cast flagpoles, drilled out hands and eagles, and inserted brass rod.

Now I am tackling 211 French fusiliers in one go.

Monday, May 4, 2015

Cascadia Brigade

I painted these figures on commission for my friend and gaming buddy Kevin.  The figures are all Wargames Foundry for the 1st Opium War.  Kevin opted to mix a little history with local geography and named all the units after local places.

1st Foote, "Selkirk Highlanders"


All the infantry units got black facings, but I made an attempt with these highlanders at the Gordon tartan.


The flags were from Kevin's own design, printed on my home printer.


I used three tone shading on most surfaces.  You may not see it on these pictures, but the figures have a nice color depth.

2nd Foote, "Fort Hood Guard"

This regiment got grey trousers.  All the private soldiers are the same pose, which gives the unit a nice, disciplined look.


I had trouble finding a definitive color for the canteen on top of the backpack.  Some sources showed tan, some showed black, and some showed the old Napoleonic light blue.  I opted for tan to provide a nice contrast with the red coats and black leather.


3rd Foote, "Astorias Regiment"

This regiment got the regulation blue trousers.  It is a smart looking uniform.  The three tone shading worked especially well with the blue.


I tried to make the ground work look like Afghanistan, with more muted colors than I usually use for North America or Europe.


4th Foote, "Cascadia Regiment"

This last infantry regiment got brownish / khaki trousers.  This is a color combination that I have been using more often over the past couple of years.  The shade is Delta's "Dark Chocolate."  For the main tone, I mix Dark Chocolate with Delta's "Territorial Beige," about 1:3.  The highlight is straight Territorial Beige.


In this shot you can clearly see the pink highlights I sparing applied to the red coats.


Mounted Officers

Kevin used figures from a variety of periods for his mounted officers, figuring that British officers were an eccentric lot!


This poor fellow misplaced his arm at some point.


This guy is the very picture of a dashing officer.


The horses also got three tone shading.


I painted this officer in the uniform of the 1st KGL Hussars.


This is probably my favorite pose of the officers.  The coat also got the Dark Chocolate / Territorial Beige treatment.


This is my favorite paint job on the horses.  Each horse got a black acrylic wash from fetlock to knee.


Royal Foot Artillery

These figures were the quickest to paint.  While the crew are all Foundry, the guns are 6-pdrs from Sash and Saber's ACW range.  I do love those Sash and Saber guns!


The 6-pdr barrels got a base coat of Delta's "Brown Iron Oxide" followed by an enamel, Testor's "Gold."  Once the enamel was dry, I sealed it with a coat of acrylic flat clear.  If you miss that step, the enamel paint may run when you dullcote the figures.


The wood work was a simple drybrush of Delta's "Liberty Blue" over the black primer.  It looks good without being overdone.  I painted the metal fittings black, then mixed my own gunmetal paint from Apple Barrel's "Pure Silver," Delta's "Dark Burnt Umber," and Delta's "Tangerine" in a ratio of 5:1:1.


These figures were a treat to paint.  They had great facial detail, and the sculpted folds in the uniform made these rather plain uniforms pop.


This period is not one of my usual ones, but the uniforms are close enough to Napoleonics that the same techniques apply.  There were 112 foot figures, 6 mounted figures, and 4 guns in this collection, and I took about two months to paint them.  It was a fun commission, definitely!

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Blue Moon 18mm Napoleonic British Hussars

I am still working on fielding all the troops needed for any of the General de Brigade Peninsular War scenarios.  I have pretty well settled on Blue Moon for my Napoleonic armies, since the range is affordable and attractive.  All the British cavalry I will need are two regiments of light dragoons and one of hussars.


Here are the 1st KGL Hussars.  They fought very well, and of course their uniform was colorful!  I opted to paint these in their white gloves.


Blue Moon provides three different rider and six different horse poses.  By bending arms, I was able to introduce even more variety.


I had a Dullcote mishap with these.  I will probably break out the airbrush and spray them with an acrylic matt clear, then try the Dullcote again once the humidity drops,


I was very pleased with these figures.  They should look great on the tabletop!

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Ancient Greek Light Troops

Here are the final figures for my classical Greek army.  These are all Old Glory 15mm figures on Litko bases.  (You can see the hoplites and the cavalry by clicking the links.)

First up are the archers.  There are twelve bases.  Greek armies usually did not make much use of bows, but Athens kept a force of mercenary archers on hand.





The majority of Greek light troops would have been javelin men.  The sculptor chose to portray these men with a bare right foot and shod left foot.  I thought it was a mistake until I read Head's Armies of the Macedonian and Punic Wars, where the only drawing of a Greek javelin man showed just this configuration.  Apparently there is ONE written reference to skirmishers wearing a sandal on their lead foot so they could kick the enemy.  I am skeptical, not least because I have tried walking with just one shoe.  It's not pleasant.  There are 32 bases of javelin men here.





Last are the peltasts.  I would usually consider these medium infantry, capable of skirmishing or fighting in close order in a pinch.  All rules I have ever seen, however, class them as light infantry.  There are twelve bases of peltasts in my army.





With these light bases finished, my Greek army is complete!  I may add to it in the future, but for now I am calling this project done!