Saturday, November 7, 2009

British Grenadier Disruption Point Markers

British Grenadier! has a pretty interesting casualty mechanism. Units start by taking disruption points (DPs), which they can accrue from rolling for movement, moving through difficult terrain, or taking fire. Once a unit takes three DPs, any more hits actually cause casualties. Units can rally off their DPs each turn, and unit quality and leader proximity make a huge difference in how well a unit can lose its DPs.

I've only played British Grenadier! in solo play with my 15mm figures, but I found that casualties were relatively light, at least compared to other wargames. Disruption plays a huge role in the game, as units lose effectiveness based on the number of DPs they've accumulated. Once a unit starts taking actual casualties, it usually doesn't hang around much longer.

The point of this long prologue is that DPs are very important to the game system. I wanted to create some markers that would be visually appealing, easy to handle, unobtrusive on the tabletop, and durable and communicate disruption level at a glance. With my 15mm figures I had used individual pieces of Woodland Scenics' talus, which worked alright, but I needed something a little bigger for my 28mm army.



I took my inspiration from Giles at Tarleton's Quarter, substituting talus for the cork he used, and dressing the terrain up a bit. A white glue wash, two coats of gloss varnish, and one coat of matt should endure that the pieces can endure a lot of handling. I did 22 pieces for each disruption level. That should be enough for the entire Freeman's Farm scenario.

2 comments:

  1. Yes,it would seem we both are drawing inspiration from Giles blog as I a also plan on using stones for my DP markers.:-)

    Cheers
    Christopher

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  2. Guys, you know it makes sense!! Actually, I nicked this idea off Eclaireur himself (I think), but he was using "out of the packet" cork and I thought that painting them as little cairns of stones looked a bit neater. Scott takes the look one stage further with making the bases look much better. I haven't bothered with casualty markers as yet, as we always make notes and then remove bases, but Scott has me thinking...

    Best wishes

    Giles

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